justice or else

Do Black Lives Matter Anymore?

Recently, the nation united for the Justice or Else, Million Man March in Washington, D.C., to discuss racial injustices within our society for all of the police brutality that has taken place with our men and women. This was such a historical event but yet it failed to receive nationwide television coverage. Especially, from major predominantly African American television stations.

So this lives me to wonder if black lives important? Do we matter in this world?

I have created a poem that honors our lost ones in society due to injustices.

It is entitled Do Black Lives Matter Anymore?

 

Walter scott

Black Lives Matter: Walter Scott Gunned Down by Police

walter scottBy Chris Rivera

 

On Saturday April 4, an unarmed Walter Lamer Scott, 50, was shot eight times in the back by Patrolman Michael Slager during a routine traffic stop in North Charleston, S.C. It has been reported by the Associated Press that Walter Scott owed at least $7,500 in child support, but there was no warrant for his arrest.

It was during this traffic stop that Scott decided to jump out of his car and flee. Not knowing that moments later he would be murdered. Officer Slager would argue that he feared for his life because Walter Scott had taken his taser and he shot Scott during the struggle over his weapon. The statement that the police released would also support Slager’s story.

In a video from Michael Slager’s dash cam he could be heard asking a senior officer, “What happens next?”

The senior officer replies by saying, “Once they get here, it’ll be real quick. They’re gonna tell you, you’re gonna be off for a couple days and we’ll come back and interview you then. They’re not gonna ask you any type of questions right now. They’re gonna take your weapon,” the officer says. “It’d probably be a good idea to jot down your thoughts about whatever happened … once the adrenaline stops pumping.”

Slager responds, “It’s pumping,” and then laughs.

If it wasn’t for a video taken by a bystander, Feidin Santana, that caught the incident on his phone, Slager’s statement would have been the official story. The video starts in the middle of confrontation and Walter Scott is seeing running away from Michael Slager. It is during confrontation that an object, may be a taser but not certain, falls behind the two men, and Officer Slager takes out his gun and begins to fire eight rounds from his service revolver. Scott was hit four times in the back and once in the ear.

The officer then walks towards Scott and yells, “Put your hand behind your back.” He then begins to handcuff him. After he handcuffs Scott, Slager is seen walking back to where the object fell, he picks it up and walks back to where Scott is and drops it.

During the Tennessee V. Garner case, in 1985, the Supreme Court found that the “police can’t employ deadly force on a suspect who is running away.” The case involved a 15 year old Edward Garner, who broke into a house where he stole a purse with $10 in it. The police officer shot the child in the back of the head so he wouldn’t escape. It takes three days for Michael Slager to be fired and arrested for the murder of Walter Scott. If it wasn’t for the gruesome video that surfaced it may have taken longer, or may not have happened at all.

Reflections of 2014 & Why I Now Support Segregation

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(Source: Facebook.com/sancophaleague)

2014 was a strange year to be Black. We had Ferguson, Eric Garner, and so many others that I’ve officially lost count. There were marches, demonstrations, and riots. Some protests were peaceful; some, not so much. Through all of this hurt, pain, and mass confusion, I realized something very controversial, yet powerful: I believe in segregation.

I know you’re probably reading this and wondering if you misread what I wrote. The answer is, “No, you didn’t.” I said that I believe in segregation. I believe that the only way for Black people to not only survive, but to thrive, is for us to segregate. Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m no racist, and I certainly mean no harm or ill will towards any other race. I am, however, more concerned with the health and wealth of the Black community than any other community, and I do not see it as racist to love and care for oneself above all others. I see it as wisdom. Besides, every other race does the same thing anyway; we (Black people) are the only ones who haven’t gotten hip to the game. Instead, we’ve let others manipulate us into feeling bad about choosing our own above all others. We’ve foolishly fallen into the lie of reversed racism, a lie that dooms us to inclusion and accommodation at our own expense. In short, we’ve been bamboozled!

I read an article awhile ago about an Asian businessman in the hair care industry. He was speaking about how he often heard complaints from Black people about him (and other Asians) shutting them out of the hair care industry by only choosing to conduct business with other Asians. His response completely changed the lens in which I viewed the situation. In responding, the man said that he had no issues and meant no harm towards Black people. He said that he was simply looking out for the best interests of his people; he called it practicing “Asian love.” He said that he could have done more business with Blacks but doing that would be at the expense of other Asian business owners, which, according to him, would not be practicing Asian love. Finally, he dropped the greatest nugget of knowledge in the entire response. He said that Blacks should help and support each other, in effect, practice Black love, instead of complaining about other people not giving them opportunities. After reading this article and seeing the current state of the Black community at large (not the small pockets of affluence that some like to tout as wholly representative of the race), I began to craft my beliefs about our need to segregate.

Consider this: The Greenwood community in Tulsa, OK, known as The Black Wall Street was the most affluent Black community that America has ever known prior to the 1921 Holocaust that destroyed it. (If you don’t believe me or haven’t heard, then do a quick google search, and you’ll see.) Within this community, Blacks owned every type of industry, even their own airplanes in the early 20th century. It was bigger than Atlanta or any other chocolate city that you’ve ever imagined. The Black owned industries were so affluent and top flight that White citizens in the same city had to come to the Black community of Greenwood to receive quality services. And this was all prior to 1921!

The important part of the Greenwood model, however, is that all of the Black people fully supported these industries. They ate at Black restaurants, watched movies in the Black movie theaters, bought their clothes at the Black retailers, and supported every other Black industry/service in Greenwood. (Of course, during this time, they had to because of segregation.) In being segregated and, thereby, exclusively supporting their own, however, they were able to accrue wealth for their community.

This is exactly what the Black community needs to do today, but not because the government has forced us to do it. We should do it for the health and wealth of our community; we should practice Black love. An economist once told me that a dollar has to circulate seven times in a community in order for that community to gain money. That means that a person would need to frequent seven establishments in one community to contribute to its wealth. So take a second and think of how many Black owned establishments that you frequent. No shade, but nearly every time I see an Asian, they are driving a Honda, Kia, or a Hyundai. Why…because they are supporting Asian brands. They are practicing Asian love, and they are not the only ones to do this. Nearly every other race of people supports its own, but we have been tricked into believing that doing so is racist.

Those who have been behind this lie have a vested interest in it. Just think: The buying power of the Black community would make it the 11th richest nation in the world. Presently, we are using those resources to advance the communities of those who oppress us. In short, we are funding our own oppression by not investing in our own communities and, instead, investing in others. Think about how our communities would look if we invested in our own, if we practiced Black love. Think about how it would look if it spread from America to Africa and other Black communities in the diaspora. Imagine the power. We wouldn’t worry about cops in Ferguson because we would have our own police departments staffed with people who have a vested interest in our community. We wouldn’t have to fight for equal rights because we would have our own seats at the table and control our own destiny.

So, yes, I say it loud and proud. “I believe in segregation.” In a perfect world, we wouldn’t need it. We would truly be judged as Dr. King outlined in his “I Have A Dream” speech. The world, however, is far from perfect, and I am a realist. So in the words of George Wallace (although for an entirely different purpose), I say, “Segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever!”

Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin

Killing Our Black Community

Jordan Davis, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Mike Brown, Oscar Grant, Rodney King, Malice Green, Renisha McBride and several others all have one thing in common. They have all died to either police brutality or because of some malicious acts caused by some insensitive human beings. It seems our black community is dying at such an alarming rates. These names have began to slowly fade away because mainstream media  doesn’t want us to remember these individuals. It is truly sad that we have reverted back to the 1940s where segregation was running rapid in the cities. If you honestly, think about it we are reliving past times. Marching, rioting, protesting and demanding justice for fallen angels who were unarmed targets to police who treated them like animals.  But when we are losing four or more African Americans within a month or two of it self it’s incredibly ridiculous.

Mike Brown unarmed teen, shot down by police
Mike Brown

Michael Brown, was an unarmed teen, who was shot down by the hands of the police due to  an alleged robbery. He was supposed to start college in a couple of weeks.

 

 

John Crawford fatally shot because he was carrying a toy gun at Wal-Mart
John Crawford

John Crawford, was a young father of 22 years of age that was fatally shot in the chest after failing to adhere to officers orders of dropping his BB gun which he planned to purchase from Walmart.

 

 

Eric Garner
Eric Garner

Eric Garner, was a family man who suffered from asthma, officers tried to arrest him and while he resisted, they threw him to the ground and placed him in a chokehold. Garner, while in no position to move, cried out that he couldn’t breathe and tried to reach for an inhaler while officers mistakenly took for a gun. His death was ruled a homicide and video has now become viral.

Renisha McBride
Renisha McBride

Renisha McBride, was a young lady who crashed her car in the middle of the night, and was seeking help, knocked on the door and window of a middle age Caucasian man at his Dearborn Heights home, in Michigan. The shooter Theodore Wafer, fired through the door, which McBride endured a shot to the face. Wafer has just been convicted for second degree murder, manslaughter, and possession of a firearm during commission of a felony. He was found guilty on all three charges on August 7, 2014.

Ezell Ford
Ezell Ford

Ezell Ford, a mentally ill man, who was walking down the street while he was stopped by police for investigation. According to reports, Ford wrested with cops and attempted to grab an officers gun. The backup officers shot him, while the other officer while wrestling with Ford shot him and he later died.

Dante Parker
Dante Parker

Dante Parker, was tased by a female police officer after she mistakenly identified him as a burglary suspect, because he supposedly fit the description of someone who did,  because he was riding a bike, just as the actual suspect was. But the family man, worked 12 years at a Daily Press Paper as a pressman in their production department. Comments from family friends and co-workers say Parker often rode his bike, to lose weight and stay healthy, that he’d many times could be found running up and down stairs, and simply being a family man. He was apprehended by police who tased him because she felt he was resisting arrest meanwhile in the back seat of the police car Parker had difficulties breathing, so they rushed him to the hospital, but he like many others, also died.

There are so many faces that have died to foolishness. Why aren’t these cops, and citizens prosecuted through the fullest extent of the law? If anything they are forced to step down and take on desk duty. The worse part is no one cares enough about the black community. I can say Reverend Al Sharpton comes and speaks out about the injustices we face. But where all the influential voices in music and film. These are the people that can change the opinions of our young people. We watch young people spend hundreds of dollars on products and clothes from rich and successful entertainers yet when incidents like this happen we rarely hear anything from them. Now I am not saying it is their responsibility. But an injustice in an urban community is an injustice anywhere. Perhaps, their music could influence some type of change. Since we know the influence of Hip Hop already has on the young black community.

I don’t know when the killings of Blacks will ever end. But what I do know there is no respect at all in the black community. They are finding  new ways to kill us off.  If we aren’t killing each other, they’re murdering us. Until we decide to finally come together and unite as a community we will continue to get treated like animals with no voice. We have to remember the words and actions of Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Hopefully, one day people will finally see us as ordinary people with thoughts, feelings and opinions just like anybody else. I pray for a day where we aren’t victims of racial profiling and truly respected individuals of society.

Remember, YOU MATTER, Let’s Stop Injustice